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    July 28, 2020
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K LOCAL ADVICE FROM A LOCAL EXPERT Q: My sister has dementia eand it seems like her appetite is gone. Do you have any suggestions? There can be many barriers for somebody Countrykouse Residence Tessa Johnson MSN, BSN, RN, CDP Executive Director Dickinson, ND with dementia to maintain good nutrition. They may forget theyjust ate and want to eat again, or they might get distracted during meal time and not take in adequate nutrition. As a natural part of aging a complicating factor is our taste buds dying out, so we don't perceive food having the flavor it once did. Here are some things Some things we can do to promote good nutrition: Offer frequent, small, igh calorie snacks Offer finger foods that she can hold as they walk (if they are having trouble sitting stil) Set the table in an attractive way (use table cloths, contrasting color of dishes to help food color stand out) Make sure she has good oral care, get attention for ill-fitting dentures Provide small portions Get her "started" by putting utensil or food in hand Avoid nonfood items on table that might be accidently ingested (ie. flowers, tea bags, butter pats, sugar packets, wrappers/plastic wrap) Cut food if needed COUNTRYHOUSE IRESIDENCE for memory care Ê 701.483.2266| countryhouse.net & K LOCAL ADVICE FROM A LOCAL EXPERT Q: My sister has dementia eand it seems like her appetite is gone. Do you have any suggestions? There can be many barriers for somebody Countrykouse Residence Tessa Johnson MSN, BSN, RN, CDP Executive Director Dickinson, ND with dementia to maintain good nutrition. They may forget theyjust ate and want to eat again, or they might get distracted during meal time and not take in adequate nutrition. As a natural part of aging a complicating factor is our taste buds dying out, so we don't perceive food having the flavor it once did. Here are some things Some things we can do to promote good nutrition: Offer frequent, small, igh calorie snacks Offer finger foods that she can hold as they walk (if they are having trouble sitting stil) Set the table in an attractive way (use table cloths, contrasting color of dishes to help food color stand out) Make sure she has good oral care, get attention for ill-fitting dentures Provide small portions Get her "started" by putting utensil or food in hand Avoid nonfood items on table that might be accidently ingested (ie. flowers, tea bags, butter pats, sugar packets, wrappers/plastic wrap) Cut food if needed COUNTRYHOUSE IRESIDENCE for memory care Ê 701.483.2266| countryhouse.net &