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    August 25, 2020
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LOCAL ADVICE FROM A LOCAL EXPERT Q:". My husband has dementia and take care of him at home. I am concerned with the weather changing and getting colderImay have some impending safety issues as he likes to go outside. Do you have any Tessa Johnson MSN, BSN, RN, CDP Executive Director CountryHouse Residence Dickinson, ND suggestions? Dementia can and does affect different parts of the brain for those suffering. If the frontal lobe of the brain is affected, a patient's judgment is often altered. Those of us with a healthy brain can use social cues to plan and make judgments regarding cold weather. We can see snow, hear the wind, or feel the cold; those living with dementia aren't able to do those things. As his care partner, it is important that you do implement some safety features to help keep your husband safe. In the winter, getting outside and active can be fun for everyone. But going outdoors with someone with dementia requires great care. Of course, one of the most obvious things is to make sure that heisn't going outside unattended. If he does it will be hard for him to feel the sensation when he is too cold or at risk. He may not dress appropriately for colder weather and slippery conditions. Perception problems may make it difficult for him to see ice on the sidewalk or he may believe snow to be a solid surface. Here are some other suggestions to manage outdoor risks: Cover all exposed skin. Hats and scarves are particularly important. Dress in bright colors and add reflective material to clothing in case he was to wander away or get lost. Encourage him to take smaller steps and slow down when walking in unsafe conditions outside. Make sure he wears non-skid shoes. Buy boots that use Velcro instead of laces to make it easier for him to dress himself Overall, the risks when people with dementia go missing are particularly high in the cold winter months. It can also happen without warning. If you plan ahead and follow some of these recommendations, you can be much more at ease. COUNTRYHOUSE IRESIDENCE for memory care Ê 701.483.2266| countryhouse.net & LOCAL ADVICE FROM A LOCAL EXPERT Q:". My husband has dementia and take care of him at home. I am concerned with the weather changing and getting colderImay have some impending safety issues as he likes to go outside. Do you have any Tessa Johnson MSN, BSN, RN, CDP Executive Director CountryHouse Residence Dickinson, ND suggestions? Dementia can and does affect different parts of the brain for those suffering. If the frontal lobe of the brain is affected, a patient's judgment is often altered. Those of us with a healthy brain can use social cues to plan and make judgments regarding cold weather. We can see snow, hear the wind, or feel the cold; those living with dementia aren't able to do those things. As his care partner, it is important that you do implement some safety features to help keep your husband safe. In the winter, getting outside and active can be fun for everyone. But going outdoors with someone with dementia requires great care. Of course, one of the most obvious things is to make sure that heisn't going outside unattended. If he does it will be hard for him to feel the sensation when he is too cold or at risk. He may not dress appropriately for colder weather and slippery conditions. Perception problems may make it difficult for him to see ice on the sidewalk or he may believe snow to be a solid surface. Here are some other suggestions to manage outdoor risks: Cover all exposed skin. Hats and scarves are particularly important. Dress in bright colors and add reflective material to clothing in case he was to wander away or get lost. Encourage him to take smaller steps and slow down when walking in unsafe conditions outside. Make sure he wears non-skid shoes. Buy boots that use Velcro instead of laces to make it easier for him to dress himself Overall, the risks when people with dementia go missing are particularly high in the cold winter months. It can also happen without warning. If you plan ahead and follow some of these recommendations, you can be much more at ease. COUNTRYHOUSE IRESIDENCE for memory care Ê 701.483.2266| countryhouse.net &